A few recent articles and reviews and interviews

Peter Oakes, “Law and Theology in Galatians.” In, Torah in the New Testament Papers Delivered at the Manchester-Lausanne Seminar of June 2008. (The Library of New Testament Studies 401) Edited by Michael Tait and Peter Oakes. T & T Clark International, 2010. 143-153. 9780567006738.

R.B. Matlock, “Helping Paul’s Argument Work? : The Curse of Galatians 3.10-14.” In, Torah in the New Testament Papers Delivered at the Manchester-Lausanne Seminar of June 2008. (The Library of New Testament Studies 401) Edited by Michael Tait and Peter Oakes. T & T Clark International, 2010. 154-179. 9780567006738.

Jeremy Punt, “Cross-Purposes in Paul? Violence of the Cross, Galatians, and Human Dignity.” Scriptura. 102 (2009): 446-462.

Review of du Toit, Andrie. Focusing on Paul: Persuasion and Theological Design in Romans and Galatians. (Beihefte Zur Zeitschrift Fur Die Neutestamentliche Wissenschaft Und Die Kunde … Und Die Kunde Der Alteren Kirche). Edited by Cilliers Breytenbach and David S. du Toit. Walter De Gruyter, 2007. by Christoph Stenschke. Scriptura. 102 (2009): 599f. Also reviewed by Sheila McGinn.

Review of Bruce Hansen, ‘All of You Are One’: The Social Vision of Galatians 3.28, 1 Corinthians 12.13 and Colossians 3.11. (Library of New Testament Studies) London: T&T Clark, 2010. 0567136043, 9780567136046. by Kobus Kok.

Susan Eastman was interviewed by Nijay Gupta and has a few things to say with regard to Mike Bird’s query: “More generally, in Philippians 3, Paul appears to be de-valuing his Jewish background and credentials. How do you understand Paul’s view of Israel, especially with reference to Romans 9-11 and Galatians 6:16? [NB: This question specifically comes from Mike Bird]”

Thomas Schreiner has been interviewed about his ZECNT commentary on Galatians in two parts: one, two.

One response to “A few recent articles and reviews and interviews

  1. RESPONSE NUMBER TWENTY-SIX To Galatians Re-imagined: Reading with the Eyes of the Vanquished (Fortress 2010) by Brigitte Kahl

    [ . . . ] The Roman Games, icons of the empire, were famously staged in the Colosseum. Less well known is that the games were staged in arenas throughout the empire, and were sponsored by Roman authority long before the founding of the imperium of the Caesars.

    [. . . ] Kahl delineates many of the horrendous details of the blood sport in all its gore and excess. For this reader, Professor Kahl persuasively reminds that the games served as ideological renforcement via the medium of lavish, murderous entertainment.

    [. . . ]

    Persuasive too, is the assignment of the outcast role to the victims killed in the course of the games, whether animals, criminals or prisoners of war.

    Less persuasive is the role Kahl assigns (p. 151) to the spectators of the games, in their assigned arena seats, who, Kahl argues, saw themselves as “involved, committed, and transformed by actively participating as players in Caesar’s games. It was as agents and partakers in the supreme sacrifice that all were becoming one and self: the life of the Other.”

    Spectators partaking, spectators as all becoming one, spectators as sharing the life of the other is phrasing that read as the language of Christian ritual, imported into the context of Rome’s public games.

    In subsequent chapters, is Kahl going to re-import this communion terminology back and forth, between Pauline Eucharistic references and the imperial cult, in order to make the case that Paul’s missives to his converts were part of a subversive critique of the cult of emperor worship?

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