Monthly Archives: January 2011

A few recent articles and reviews and interviews

Peter Oakes, “Law and Theology in Galatians.” In, Torah in the New Testament Papers Delivered at the Manchester-Lausanne Seminar of June 2008. (The Library of New Testament Studies 401) Edited by Michael Tait and Peter Oakes. T & T Clark International, 2010. 143-153. 9780567006738.

R.B. Matlock, “Helping Paul’s Argument Work? : The Curse of Galatians 3.10-14.” In, Torah in the New Testament Papers Delivered at the Manchester-Lausanne Seminar of June 2008. (The Library of New Testament Studies 401) Edited by Michael Tait and Peter Oakes. T & T Clark International, 2010. 154-179. 9780567006738.

Jeremy Punt, “Cross-Purposes in Paul? Violence of the Cross, Galatians, and Human Dignity.” Scriptura. 102 (2009): 446-462.

Review of du Toit, Andrie. Focusing on Paul: Persuasion and Theological Design in Romans and Galatians. (Beihefte Zur Zeitschrift Fur Die Neutestamentliche Wissenschaft Und Die Kunde … Und Die Kunde Der Alteren Kirche). Edited by Cilliers Breytenbach and David S. du Toit. Walter De Gruyter, 2007. by Christoph Stenschke. Scriptura. 102 (2009): 599f. Also reviewed by Sheila McGinn.

Review of Bruce Hansen, ‘All of You Are One’: The Social Vision of Galatians 3.28, 1 Corinthians 12.13 and Colossians 3.11. (Library of New Testament Studies) London: T&T Clark, 2010. 0567136043, 9780567136046. by Kobus Kok.

Susan Eastman was interviewed by Nijay Gupta and has a few things to say with regard to Mike Bird’s query: “More generally, in Philippians 3, Paul appears to be de-valuing his Jewish background and credentials. How do you understand Paul’s view of Israel, especially with reference to Romans 9-11 and Galatians 6:16? [NB: This question specifically comes from Mike Bird]”

Thomas Schreiner has been interviewed about his ZECNT commentary on Galatians in two parts: one, two.

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The Message began with Galatians

I recently finished reading Eugene Peterson’s Eat This Book: A Conversation in the Art of Spiritual Reading and was surprised to learn that The Message began when he was teaching Galatians to a Sunday school class (132ff). He was frustrated that people seemed more interested in the amount of sugar in their coffee than in the text. The first draft of Galatians began as an attempt to increase their interest in the process of Bible study. He also reveals that when he was young J.B. Phillips’ new translation deeply impacted him. I’ve read Peterson’s The Message but not Phillips’ translation, and I don’t expect to be authoring a paraphrase anytime soon!

Quote of the Day from Peterson:
“I am very conscious that I am in a vast company of translators—teachers in classrooms, pastors in pulpits, parents around the supper table, writers in languages all over the world, baptized Christians in workplaces and social gatherings past imagining—all of us at this same work, collaborating in translating the word of God, reading and then living this text, eating this book, and then getting these Scriptures into whatever language is heard and spoken on the street on which we live.”